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The Countdown to an Independent Newspaper in Cuba Has Begun

"The newspaper was talking about you..." sings the voice of Joaquín Sabina, while I read the newspaper Granma. On the cover, as usual, there's some event. A tribute to a figure from the past, a reminder, a phrase someone said forty or fifty years ago. All the pages have this rancid stink of journalism that doesn't dare to address the present, that avoids the here and now
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Asking For Criticism and Then Calling the Messenger a Counter-Revolutionary

Revolutionary Vigilance, a Permanent Task He raised his hand at the meeting. The director had told them "don't hold back," so he took advantage of the chance to say what he'd remained silent about for months. He started with the very low wages paid to public health workers. Then he talked about the dirty bathrooms, the water shortages, that the only sterilizer was broken, the leaks all over the hospital. He continued with the heat in the waiting room packed with patients and the lack of surgical instruments.
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Venezuela, With Eyes Wide Open

Genesis Carmona, college student and local beauty pageant winner shot in the head during the protests, being rushed to the hospital, where she died. Photo from runrun.es They say no one learns a lesson through someone else's head, that we repeat the mistakes of others and stumble, over and over, on the same stone. Skeptics assure us that people forget, close their eyes to the past and commit identical mistakes. Venezuela, however, has begun to disprove that inevitability. Amid a reality marked by insecurity, shortages and inflation, Venezuelans are trying to amend a mistake that has lasted too long
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Am I Living in Cuba, or Never Never Land?

Focus on a fixed point and you'll see that we are, in fact, advancing. Graphic humor from Santana Everything moves clumsily, heavily. Even the sun seems to take longer than normal up there. The clock knows nothing of precision and the minute hand is stuck. Making an appointment with the exactitude of three-fifteen or twenty-to-eleven is the pure pedantry of those in a hurry.
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Race and Identity in Cuba

Backside of the Cuban Identify Card with a box for "Skin" It's just been born and in a few hours they will register the baby with its brand new name. A few days will pass before the parents get the birth certificate and then the so-called "minor card." Without an identification card you can't receive products from the ration market, enroll in school, get a job, travel on an inter-provincial bus, or put your belongings in a bag-check at a shop. Every day of your life you need this document, which at the top carries a unique combination of eleven digits. On the little piece of cardboard your temporal and geographic data is registered... and also certain physical details.
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The Havana Book Fair Behind the Scenes

Behind the shelves there is another International Book Fair. One barely perceived among the partitions and walls of the exhibition areas. The national newspapers will never report on it, but these parallel and hidden events sustain the other one. A network of hardship, endless workdays and poverty-level wages, support the main publishing showcase on the island. For each page printed, there is a long list of irregularities, improvisations and exploitations.
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Being a Journalist in Cuba: Success Is Measured By Your Ability To Make Things Up

Our apologies, we do not have subtitles for this video. Article 53 of the Cuban Constitution (referenced in the video) reads: ARTICLE 53. Citizens have freedom of speech and of the press in keeping with the objectives of socialist society. Material conditions for the exercise of that right are provided by the fact that the press, radio, television, cinema, and other mass media are state or social property and can never be private property. This assures their use at exclusive service of the working people and in the interests of society
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Cuban Regime "Cleans up" Opposition for CELAC Summit

Infanta and Vapor Streets, eight at night. The scaffolding creaks under the weight of its occupants. The area is dark, but there are still two painters passing their brushes over the dirty balconies, the facades, the tall columns facing the avenue. Time is short, the 2nd Summit of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) will start in just a few hours and everything should be ready for the guests. The streets where the presidential caravans will pass will be touched up, the asphalt addressed, the potholes and poverty hidden
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